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Flux du Web...

> Digital Agenda For Europe

How to make every week Code week - a debate on skills and engagement le : 05/09/2016

Date: 
Monday, 5 September, 2016 - 02:00
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CNECT EU CODE WEEK
Venue: 
Philippe Le Bon, Brussels
Contact: 
cnect-eu-code-week@ec.europa.eu

Since its beginnings in 2013 the Code Week EU has grown exponentially. In 2015 over half a million people in 46 countries participated in over 7,000 events, learning to program and cooperate in a digital environment. Also, born in the EU, the Code Week went global. In 2015 the Africa Code Week was created; also we now have ambassadors in countries like China and the US. This European initiative, aiming at fostering coding skills, digital literacy and tech-enabled collaboration is carried out by a network of passionate volunteers – the EU Code Week Ambassadors. Code Week brings together people from all walks of life – programmers and tech entrepreneurs, teachers, policy makers, big tech industry players – and most importantly – kids and young people.

The objective of the session

We are all very excited about the 4th edition of Code Week EU and are working towards reaching even higher numbers of participants. At the same time, it is an ideal moment to reflect together on how far we have gone, how this was possible, and how to move forward and reach out even further. How do we foster programming and other digital skills for 21st century work and life in an even more collaborative and sharing environment for everyone? What is the role of European policy? In other words – how do we make every week Code Week?

Chair: Mrs Claire BURY, Deputy Director General of DG CONNECT

Speakers:

  • Mrs Miapetra KUMPULA-NATRI, Member of the European Parliament, Member of the ITRE Committee
  • Mr Alessandro BOGLIOLO, Coordinator of Code Week 2016 and 2017
  • Mrs Ilona KISH,  Director of Public Libraries Association, gathering 65.000 Libraries across Europe
  • Mr Liam RYAN, Managing Director of SAP Labs, co-organizer of Africa Code Week 

The debate will look at following questions:

  1. What are the most important reasons for which individual people and organisations engage in fostering programming and related digital skills needed for today's world?
  2. How to best connect with people across the continent and the world and make a common project on these issues happen – lessons learnt 2013-2016 and a message for the future?
  3. How can we bring Code Week to the next level?

You can register for the debate here until 25 September.

For further information

EU Code Week

Code Week EU 2016 – Skill up for the digital world with #codeEU!

New record for the EU Code Week: more than half a million people took part in 2015

Come and meet the Ambassadors of Code Week on 27 September in Brussels! This amazing network of volunteers has been active since 2013 in engaging hundreds of thousands of kids and adults in coding activities across Europe and beyond. We are planning a very interactive discussion on how to work together for promoting digital skills and competencies for the 21st century work and life. This debate is hosted by Claire Bury, Deputy Director General of DG CONNECT.

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> SAGE Publications Ltd: Journal of Information Science: Table of Contents

Spatial information extraction from travel narratives: Analysing the notion of co-occurrence indicating closeness of tourist places le : 10/06/2019

Journal of Information Science, Ahead of Print. <br/>Recent advancements in social media have generated a myriad of unstructured geospatial data. Travel narratives are among the richest sources of such spatial clues. They are also a reflection of writers’ interaction with places. One of the prevalent ways to model this interaction is a points of interest (POIs) graph depicting popular POIs and routes. A relevant notion is that frequent pairwise occurrences of POIs indicate their geographic proximity. This work presents an empirical interpretation of this theory and constructs spatially enriched POI graphs, a clear augmentation to popularity-based POI graphs. A triplet pattern, rule-based spatial relation extraction technique SpatRE is proposed and compared with standard relation extraction systems Ollie and Stanford OpenIE. A travel blogs data set is also contributed containing labelled spatial relations. The performance is further evaluated on SemEval 2013 benchmark data sets. Finally, spatially enriched POI graphs are qualitatively compared with TripAdvisor and Google Maps to visualise information accuracy.

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> Edge.org

REMEMBERING MURRAY le : 26/05/2019

An EDGE Celebration of the Work and Life of
[5.28.19]

MURRAY GELL-MANN
September 15, 1929 – May 24, 2019
  

[ED. NOTE: Upon learning of the death of long-time friend, and colleague Murray Gell-Mann, I posed the question below to the Edgies who knew and/or worked with him. —JB]

Can you tell us a personal story about Murray and yourself (about physics, or not)?  


THE REALITY CLUB
Leonard Susskind, George Dyson, Stuart Kauffman, John Brockman, Julian Barbour, Freeman Dyson, Neil Gershenfeld, Paul Davies, Virginia Louise Trimble, Alan Guth, Gino Segre, Sara Lippincott, Emanuel Derman, Jeremy Bernstein, George Johnson, Seth Lloyd, W. Brian Arthur, W. Daniel Hillis, Frank Tipler, Karl Sabbagh, Daniel C. Dennett


[ED. NOTE: For starters, here's a story Murray told about himself when I spent time with him in Santa Fe over Christmas vacation in 2003, excerpted from "The Making of a PhysicistEdge, June 3, 2003—JB]

Uncharacteristically, I discussed my application to Yale with my father, who asked, "What were you thinking of putting down?" I said, "Whatever would be appropriate for archaeology or linguistics, or both, because those are the things I'm most enthusiastic about. I'm also interested in natural history and exploration."

He said, "You'll starve!"

After all, this was 1944 and his experiences with the Depression were still quite fresh in his mind; we were still living in genteel poverty. He could have quit his job as the vault custodian in a bank and taken a position during the war that would have utilized his talents — his skill in mathematics, for example — but he didn't want to take the risk of changing jobs. He felt that after the war he would regret it, so he stayed where he was. This meant that we really didn't have any spare money at all.

I asked him, "What would you suggest?"

He mentioned engineering, to which I replied, "I'd rather starve. If I designed anything it would fall apart." And sure enough when I took an aptitude test a year later I was advised to take up nearly anything but engineering."

Then my father suggested, "Why don't we compromise — on physics?"


Introduction
By Geoffrey West

Murray Gell-Mann was one of the great scientists of the 20th century, one of its few renaissance people and a true polymath. He is best known for his seminal contributions to fundamental physics, for helping to bring order and symmetry to the apparently chaotic world of the elementary particles and the fundamental forces of nature. He dominated the field from the early ‘50s, when he was still in his twenties, up through the late ‘70s. Basically, he ran the show. By modern standards he didn’t publish a lot, but when he did we all hung on every word. It is an amazing litany of accomplishments: strangeness, the renormalization group, color and quantum chromodynamics, and of course, quarks and SU(3), for which he won the Nobel prize in 1969.

He was the Robert Andrews Millikan Professor Emeritus of Theoretical Physics at the California Institute of Technology, a cofounder of the Santa Fe Institute, where he was a Distinguished Fellow; a former director of the J.D. and C.T. MacArthur Foundation; one of the Global Five Hundred honored by the U.N. Environment Program; a former Citizen Regent of the Smithsonian Institution; a former member of the President's Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology; and the author of The Quark and the Jaguar: Adventures in the Simple and the Complex.

Despite his extraordinary contributions to high-energy physics, Murray maintained throughout his life an enduring passion for understanding how the messy world of culture, economies, ecologies and human interaction, and especially language, evolved from the beautifully ordered world of the fundamental laws of nature. How did complexity evolve from simplicity? Can we develop a generic science of complex adaptive systems? In the ‘80s he helped found the Santa Fe Institute as a hub on the academic landscape for addressing such vexing questions in a radically transdisciplinary environment.

Murray Gell-Mann knew, understood and was interested in everything, spoke every language on the planet, and probably those on other planets too, and was not shy in letting you know that he did. He was infamous not just for correcting your facts or your logic, but most annoyingly to some, for correcting how you should pronounce your name, your place of birth, or whatever. Luckily my name is West but that never stopped him from lecturing me many times on the Somerset dialect that I spoke as a young child.

Although he decidedly did not suffer fools and would harshly, sometimes almost cruelly, criticize sloppy thinking or incorrect factual statements, he would intensely engage with anyone regardless of their status or standing if he felt they had something to contribute. I rarely felt comfortable when discussing anything with him, whether a question of physics or lending him money, expecting to be clobbered at any moment because I had made some stupid comment or pronounced something wrong.

Murray could be a very difficult man…but what a mind! However, he loved to collaborate, to discuss ideas, and was amazingly open and inclusive even if he did dominate the proceedings. By the time we had become colleagues at SFI, I had become less and less sensitive to the master’s anticipated criticism or even to his occasional praise; the potential trepidation had pretty much disappeared and our relationship had evolved into friendship and collegiality, just in time for me to become his boss. Negotiating with Murray over a perplexing physics question is one thing, but try negotiating with him over salary and secretarial support, then you’ll really see him in action. To quote Hamlet: "He was a man. Take him for all in all. I shall not look upon his like again."

GEOFFREY WEST is a theoretical physcicist; Shannan Distinguished Professor and Past President, Santa Fe Institute; Author, ScaleGeoffrey West's Edge Bio page.

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> Journal of Scientometric Research : 2015 - 4(2)

Internet of things: A scientometric assessment of global output, 2005–2014 le : 14/10/2015

BM Gupta, SM Dhawan, Ritu Gupta

Journal of Scientometric Research 2015 4(2):104-114

The publication examines 6800 global publications on &#8220;Internet of Things&#8221; (IoT), as covered in Scopus database during 2005&#8211;2014, experiencing an annual average growth rate of 98.63&#37; and citation impact of 1.97. The global publications on IoT came from several countries, of which the top 12 (China &#8211; 44.87&#37;, USA &#8211; 8.04&#37;, Germany &#8211; 6.06&#37;, Italy &#8211; 5.19&#37;, UK &#8211; 4.84&#37;, Spain &#8211; 4.19&#37;, France &#8211; 3.46&#37;, Taiwan &#8211; 2.53&#37;, South Korea &#8211; 2.34&#37;, Switzerland &#8211; 2.16&#37;, Finland &#8211; 2.03&#37;, and India &#8211; 1.87&#37;) together accounts for 87.57&#37; and 89.56&#37; share of the global publication and citations output during 2005&#8211;2014. Only 27.96&#37; of the total global publications were cited one or more times during 2005&#8211;2014. Among subjects contributing to IoT, computer science contributed the highest publication share (64.93&#37;), followed by engineering (43.01&#37;), social sciences (4.65&#37;), business, management and accounting (3.73&#37;), physics (2.94&#37;), and decision science (2.72&#37;) during 2005&#8211;2014. Under broad subjects, the major priorities have been assigned to hardware (technology) with 43.87&#37; share, followed by applications (42.93&#37; share), architectural aspects of technology (22.69&#37; share), security aspects (17.43&#37; share), software (technology) (7.10&#37; share), privacy (6.13&#37; share), business models (0.85&#37; share), governance (0.62&#37; share), legal aspects and accountability (0.5&#37; share), etc. Among the various organizations and authors contributing to IoT, the 20 most productive organizations and authors together contributed 16.78&#37; and 6.13&#37; publications share and 25.63&#37; and 23.16&#37; citation share to the cumulative global publications and citations output during 2005&#8211;2014. The top 15 most productive journals contributed 24.54&#37; share to the total journal global publication output during 2005&#8211;2014, with largest number of papers (55) is published in Jisuanji Xuebao Chinese Journal of Computers, followed by International Journal of Distributed Sensor Network (50), Sensors Switzerland (46), China Communication (34), Wireless Personnel Communication (33), IEEE Sensors Journal (28), etc. There were only 10 highly cited papers (which came from 8 countries and involved 24 institutions and 41 authors), which had received 100 or more citations, and together got 2951 citations during 2005&#8211;2014.

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> Wiley: Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology: Table of Contents

Academic promotion and the h‐index le : 08/11/2013

Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Volume 64, Issue 12, Page 2598-2599, December 2013.

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18/02/2016 - Les désirs algorithmiques de l’action publique |

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Les derniers mois ont été marqués en France par une prolifération de rapports et de lois qui questionnent le statut des données dans l’action publique et dont le focus nous déplace de [...]

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17/01/2016 - Désirs de Data |

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Chapitre sur le désir des données et leur tissage extensif en divers milieux, s’exprimant dans l’Open Data, le Big Data, le Small Data…jusqu’au transhumanisme. Maryse [...]

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20/11/2015 - L’évènement violent que nous habitons et qui nous enveloppe : ce qui est en jeu |

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13 novembre 2015, L’évènement violent que nous habitons et qui nous enveloppe : ce qui est en jeu. Jean-Max Noyer, Professeur des Universités Les questions et le désir qui les porte, les [...]

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14/05/2014 - Lecture de “The zero marginal cost society: The internet of things, the collaborative commons and the eclipse of Capitalism” de Jeremy Rifkin (Avril 2014) |

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Notes de lecture et commentaire sur le dernier livre de J.Rifkin. Collaborative Commons, Internet Of Things, Transition énergétique...Mise en perspective et passage par I.Illich, A.Gortz, A [...]

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